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Unique insights and large ransomware attacks

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT)

This week we get a unique insight into a threat actors inner working as IBM’s X-Force IRIS security team uncover a 40GB cache of data belonging to a threat actor called “ITG18” (overlaps with another outfit alternatively known as Charming Kitten and Phosphorus) believed to be sponsored by Iran. Included in the extracted data is several hours of video “showing operators searching through and exfiltrating data from multiple compromised accounts”.
Read more …

Top 5 Security News

Aerospace and military companies in the crosshairs

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT)

ESET researchers are warning about targeted phishing attacks agains high-profile aerospace and military companies in Europe. The attacker will approach individual personnel about possible job vacancies, some file-sharing then commences with the pretense of informing about this vacancy, this is in reality malware giving the attacker foothold on the victims machine.

Be vigilant about files you get from strangers, and people who makes contact on social media and LinkedIn.

Top 5 Security News

Thunderbolt interface makes millions of PC’s in danger

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT)

It wasn’t really a news that Thunderbolt technology (USB-C) was vulnerable from years before, but now we got a demo from researcher which shows how Thunderbolt flaw allows access to a PC’s data in minutes.

More on this:

https://thunderspy.io/

https://www.wired.com/story/thunderspy-thunderbolt-evil-maid-hacking/

Top 5 Security links:

A bit of history or the 15 biggest data breaches of the 21st century

WordPress Page Builder Plugin Bugs Threaten 1 Million Sites with Full Takeover

Top 10 Routinely Exploited Vulnerabilities

Never, never pay to cybercriminals

The Confessions of the Hacker Who Saved the Internet

Woman holding laptop and media files

Zero click bugs in Apple operating systems

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

According to Google’s project zero there are vulnerabilities in Apples operating systems media managements. The vulnerabilities could let an attacker gain access by sending a specially crafted image or video to a target and no interaction would be needed from the user to be exploited.
The vulnerabilities was found using fuzzing techniques on previously found bugs, and the vulnerabilities they found have now been fixed.

More on this topic:

Google discloses zero-click bugs impacting several Apple operating systems

Top 5 Security links

Covid-19 forces changes

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Helpdesksecurity writes “A time of chaos is a time for opportunity for unscrupulous individuals and groups, and COVID-19 is seemingly an unmissable boon for cyber crooks.

We’ve already covered a variety of COVID-19-themed scams, phishing attempts, hoaxes and malware delivery campaigns, but new and inventive approaches are popping up daily.”

Top 5 Security links

Nation state actors plays the long game

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

“Qihoo 360, one of the most prominent cybersecurity firms, today published a new report accusing the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to be behind an 11-year-long hacking campaign against several Chinese industries and government agencies.”

“According to Qihoo 360, the hacking tools developed by the CIA, such as Fluxwire and Grasshopper, were used by the APT-C-39 group against Chinese targets years before the Vault 7 leak.”

Read more

Top 5 Security News

Hackers Scanning for Vulnerable Microsoft Exchange Servers, Patch Now!
Let’s Encrypt is Revoking Three Million Certificates on March 4
670+ Subdomains of Microsoft are Vulnerable to Takeover
Emoji to Zero-Day: Latin Homoglyphs in Domains and Subdomains
CPR evasion encyclopedia: The Check Point evasion repository

Ransomware

Threat Hunting or Efficiency: Pick Your EDR Path?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Cybersecurity teams face a lot of conflicting objectives—both within their teams and from upper management. But a May 2019 commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of McAfee really puts a fine point on it: When decision makers were asked which endpoint security goals and initiatives they’re prioritizing for the coming year, the top two responses were “improve security detection capabilities” (87%) and “increase efficiency in the SOC” (76%).

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Top 5 Security News

5 scams to watch out for this shopping season

Dexphot Malware Hijacked 80K+ Devices to Mine Cryptocurrency

It’s Way Too Easy to Get a .gov Domain Name

A Cause You Care About Needs Your Cybersecurity Help

Google caught a state hacker crew uploading badness to the Play Store

Do you know about all equipment connected in you operation, really?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Pen Test Partners has a great blog-post about one of their recent adventures.

This is a little bit out of the normal scenario for many, but this is regarding a finding they did on a ship. This is a good reminder to all to cover critical control number 1, inventory and control of hardware assets. It is not so easy to track this down on the spot when you got unlabeled shielded cables and deck penetration to deal with, no known paperwork or invoices related to the thing they found. They have a nice write up of what they did, what considerations they had to make.

Spoiler: In the end they figure out it is an outdated Windows machine, complete with TeamViewer installed, originating from a contract that had been expired for several years. And this machine had direct connection to the main engine of the ship.

Top 5 Security News
Sudo vulnerability discovered in Linux (CVE-2019-14287)
Cozy Bear Russian Hackers Spotted After Staying Undetected for Years
Researchers at Adaptive Mobile security release report concerning SimJacker attacks
What Your Personal Information is Worth to Cybercriminals
Help! I bought a domain and ended up with a stranger’s PayPal! And I can’t give it back

 

Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash

Millions of passenger data publicly accessible in cloud storage buckets

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

The breach, which reportedly exposed data on millions of passengers, is one of many that have resulted from organizations leaving data publicly accessible in cloud storage buckets.

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Top 5 Security News

Robocalls now flooding US phones with 200m calls per day

Is Your Medical Data Safe? 16 Million Medical Scans Left Out in the Open

GitHub gobbles biz used by NASA, Google, etc to search code for bugs and security holes in Mars rovers, apps…

LastPass Fixes Bug That Leaks Credentials

Huawei suspended from the Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams

DNS-over-HTTPS, a curse or a blessing?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

“Mozilla plans to enable support for the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol by default inside the Firefox browser for a small number of US users starting later this month.

When DoH support is enabled in Firefox, the browser will ignore DNS settings set in the operating system, and use the browser-set DoH resolver.

By moving DNS server settings from the OS to the browser level, and by encrypting the DNS traffic, DoH effectively hides DNS traffic from internet service providers (ISPs), local parental control software, antivirus software, enterprise firewalls and traffic filters, and about any other third-party that tries to intercept and sniff a user’s traffic.” according to Catalin Cimpanu for Zero Day.

This is causing some controversy and might affect current mitigating measures in place at businesses.

Read more

Top 5 Security News

Initial Metasploit Exploit Module for BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708)

18 months after indictment, Iranian phishers are still targeting universities

Instagram Confirms Security Issue Exposed User Accounts And Phone Numbers—Exclusive

Simjacker attack exploited in the wild to track users for at least two years

State-sponsored entities targeting Airline Industry (Part 1)