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Threat Hunting or Efficiency: Pick Your EDR Path?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Cybersecurity teams face a lot of conflicting objectives—both within their teams and from upper management. But a May 2019 commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of McAfee really puts a fine point on it: When decision makers were asked which endpoint security goals and initiatives they’re prioritizing for the coming year, the top two responses were “improve security detection capabilities” (87%) and “increase efficiency in the SOC” (76%).

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Top 5 Security News

5 scams to watch out for this shopping season

Dexphot Malware Hijacked 80K+ Devices to Mine Cryptocurrency

It’s Way Too Easy to Get a .gov Domain Name

A Cause You Care About Needs Your Cybersecurity Help

Google caught a state hacker crew uploading badness to the Play Store

Do you know about all equipment connected in you operation, really?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Pen Test Partners has a great blog-post about one of their recent adventures.

This is a little bit out of the normal scenario for many, but this is regarding a finding they did on a ship. This is a good reminder to all to cover critical control number 1, inventory and control of hardware assets. It is not so easy to track this down on the spot when you got unlabeled shielded cables and deck penetration to deal with, no known paperwork or invoices related to the thing they found. They have a nice write up of what they did, what considerations they had to make.

Spoiler: In the end they figure out it is an outdated Windows machine, complete with TeamViewer installed, originating from a contract that had been expired for several years. And this machine had direct connection to the main engine of the ship.

Top 5 Security News
Sudo vulnerability discovered in Linux (CVE-2019-14287)
Cozy Bear Russian Hackers Spotted After Staying Undetected for Years
Researchers at Adaptive Mobile security release report concerning SimJacker attacks
What Your Personal Information is Worth to Cybercriminals
Help! I bought a domain and ended up with a stranger’s PayPal! And I can’t give it back

 

Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash

Millions of passenger data publicly accessible in cloud storage buckets

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

The breach, which reportedly exposed data on millions of passengers, is one of many that have resulted from organizations leaving data publicly accessible in cloud storage buckets.

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Top 5 Security News

Robocalls now flooding US phones with 200m calls per day

Is Your Medical Data Safe? 16 Million Medical Scans Left Out in the Open

GitHub gobbles biz used by NASA, Google, etc to search code for bugs and security holes in Mars rovers, apps…

LastPass Fixes Bug That Leaks Credentials

Huawei suspended from the Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams

DNS-over-HTTPS, a curse or a blessing?

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

“Mozilla plans to enable support for the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol by default inside the Firefox browser for a small number of US users starting later this month.

When DoH support is enabled in Firefox, the browser will ignore DNS settings set in the operating system, and use the browser-set DoH resolver.

By moving DNS server settings from the OS to the browser level, and by encrypting the DNS traffic, DoH effectively hides DNS traffic from internet service providers (ISPs), local parental control software, antivirus software, enterprise firewalls and traffic filters, and about any other third-party that tries to intercept and sniff a user’s traffic.” according to Catalin Cimpanu for Zero Day.

This is causing some controversy and might affect current mitigating measures in place at businesses.

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Top 5 Security News

Initial Metasploit Exploit Module for BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708)

18 months after indictment, Iranian phishers are still targeting universities

Instagram Confirms Security Issue Exposed User Accounts And Phone Numbers—Exclusive

Simjacker attack exploited in the wild to track users for at least two years

State-sponsored entities targeting Airline Industry (Part 1)

RAMBleed, a new side-channel attack enables attackers to read memory not belonging to them

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

A new side-channel attack that enables an attacker to read out physical memory belonging to other processes, named RAMBleed, is published.

RAMBleed, based on a previous side channel called Rowhammer, violates arbitrary privilege boundaries. The implications of this is numerous, and vary in severity based on the other software running on the target machine. The researchers demonstrated an attack against OpenSSH in which they used RAMBleed to leak a 2048 bit RSA key, but the exploit can read other data as well.

“It is widely assumed however, that bit flips within the adversary’s own private memory have no security implications, as the attacker can already modify its private memory via regular write operations. We demonstrate that this assumption is incorrect, by employing Rowhammer as a read side channel.” reads the research paper. “More specifically, we show how an unprivileged attacker can exploit the data dependence between Rowhammer induced bit flips and the bits in nearby rows to deduce these bits, including values belonging to other processes and the kernel.”

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Top 5 Security News

Malformed Certs make DoS on any Windows servers possible

GoldBrute bot-net brute forcing 1.5 million RDP servers

Arbitrary OS command execution vulnerability found in VIM and Neovim

The Return of the WIZard: RCE in Exim (CVE-2019-10149)

BSides Oslo 2019 conference videos published on YouTube

New Initiative Aims to Fast-Track Women into Cybersecurity Careers

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

A new professional development initiative will give 100 women the opportunity to revamp their careers and prepare for new roles in cybersecurity in only 100 days…

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Top 5 Security News

What’s Behind the Wolters Kluwer Tax Outage?

Avoid a Security Endgame: Learn About the Latest “Avengers” Scam

Critical Flaw in Cisco Elastic Services Controller Allows Full System Takeove

Turla LightNeuron: An email too far

Hackers steal US$41 million worth of Bitcoin from cryptocurrency exchange

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Microsoft confirms Outlook.com and Hotmail accounts were breached

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Between 1 January and 28 March this year hackers were able to access a “limited number” of consumer Outlook.com, Hotmail and MSN Mail email accounts, Microsoft has confirmed.

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Top 5 Security News

Creator of Hub for Stolen Credit Cards Sentenced to 90 Months

Wipro Intruders Targeted Other Major IT Firms

Facebook: Yeah, we hoovered up 1.5 million email address books without permission. But it was an accident!

Weather Channel Knocked Off-Air in Dangerous Precedent

Are our infrastructures secure?

Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

Bug-hunters punch huge holes in WPA3 standard for Wi-Fi security

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Researchers have detailed a set of side-channel and downgrade attacks that potentially allow an attacker to compromise Wi-Fi networks equipped with WPA3 protection.

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Top 5 Security News

WordPress Urges Users to Uninstall Yuzo Plugin After Flaw Exploited

Google launches new security tools for G Suite users

Credential-stuffing attacks behind 30 billion login attempts in 2018

Android 7.0+ Phones Can Now Double as Google Security Keys

The right way to do AI in security

Unprotected Government Server Exposes Years of FBI Investigations

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

“A massive government data belonging to the Oklahoma Department of Securities (ODS) was left unsecured on a storage server for at least a week, exposing a whopping 3 terabytes of data containing millions of sensitive files.

The unsecured storage server, discovered by Greg Pollock, a researcher with cybersecurity firm UpGuard, also contained decades worth of confidential case files from the Oklahoma Securities Commission and many sensitive FBI investigations—all wide open and accessible to anyone without any password.”

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Top 5 Security News

DNSpionage and how to mitigate DNS tunneling

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Cisco Talos has published details regarding an APT campaign using DNS redirection and a malware they call DNSpionage. The malware supports both regular HTTP and also DNS tunneling as a way of communicating back with the attackers.

The DNS redirection part of the attack was done by compromising nameservers, and then pointing hostnames under the nameservers control to IPs of the attackers choosing. The attacker used LetsEncrypt and was in that way able to set up perfectly valid HTTPS copies of any sites.

DNS tunneling is where data are encapsulated within a DNS query and its reply, often using base64 encoding. As long as a server is able to perform domain name lookups it is able to exfiltrate data in this manner. This can also be used, with some preparation, if you find yourself in an airports WIFI or such, to proxy legitimate traffic and bypass and “signup”-requirement the WIFI might have.

This covert channel can be hard to detect, if the malware minimize the bandwidth used. If used as a proxy for larger amounts of data it will be possible to detect a significant change in the amount of DNS-queries and the size of the queries. A modern IDS or next generation firewall should be able to detect this out of the box today. Another way of mitigating is to use the split horizon DNS concept, resolving internal IPs normally, but external IPs resolving to a proxy server that can have the capability of checking the DNS information further.

Top 5 Security News