HYBRID CLOUD FOR PEAK LOADS AT DESTINATION GOTLAND

Destination Gotland is a wholly owned subsidiary of Rederi AB Gotland. On behalf of the Swedish government, they operate the ferry services between Visby, Nynäshamn and Oskarshamn.

THE CHALLENGES: RELIABLE EXPERTISE THAT WOULD NEVER FAIL

  1. During peak season, it is absolutely crucial that their booking systems work. The ferry service affects the entire island of Gotland and all their inhabitants.
  2. They were looking for expertise and experience in managing and operating booking system

Read the whole customer case here – Destination Gotland customer case

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WHEN BUSINESS CONTINUITY IS KEY

Semantix, Scandinavia’s largest language company, chose Basefarm as their managed service provider to manage their business critical applications. High availability, security expertise and flexible solutions were on the wish list during the procurement process.

“Basefarm presented an ability to handle the criteria we had, while also having the operational capacity to match the size of Semantix. Besides having the technical know-how and the financial stability, they are able to deliver flexible and specialized solutions,” says Mats Zetterberg, IT Operations Manager at Semantix.

Read the whole customer case here – Semantix customer case 

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MUSIC IN THE CLOUD PROVIDES NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR TECH COMPANIES

The digital music company X5 Music wanted to create a new environment for its digital music services. With more services in the cloud, they have both gained more time for development and reduced the need of support.

The Swedish music company X5 Music operates several digital music services. They developed much of the technology behind the services themselves, and as their success increased, so did the demands.

“The demands placed on us and our applications regarding availability and support became increasingly difficult for our small development team to manage,” says Klas Broman, CTO for X5 Music. “We needed help with support, monitoring and as creating a more uniform operating environment. This was the situation when we contacted Basefarm.

Read the whole customer case here – X5 Music customer case

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THE BANK THAT CAN SLEEP WELL AT NIGHT

MedMera Bank was looking for a partner who could take responsibility for the operation of the bank’s payment flow systems and meet extremely high standards of security and availability. The choice fell on Basefarm, which since 2015 has had overall responsibility for operation of the bank’s central payment system.

When in 2015 MedMera Bank saw a need to upgrade its operations environment, it sought a supplier that could meet the very high standards of security, delivery and availability that apply in the payment world.

“We also needed a partner who was proactive and kept up with the constant development of the industry,” says Carita Weiss, CIO of MedMera Bank.

Following a long procurement and evaluation process involving several possible operations providers, the choice finally fell on Basefarm and its PCI DSS hosting platform in Sweden.

Read the whole customer case here – MedMera Bank costumer case

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Women In Tech 2019

Every year at the International Women’s Day, Women In Tech is coming to Stockholm. At the event, you get to listen to some of the world’s most talented women discussing their success stories in business, technology and digital transformation. Basefarm attended the event to hear about the latest trends in the tech industry and what buzzwords to look out for during 2019. Here are the most important takeaways:

1. What are the key trends in the tech industry?

Big Data and digital privacy – One word that many of the speakers highlighted, that can be applied to all industries, was digital privacy. Consumers are becoming more aware of their digital footprint and the way companies use data, meaning that they are more careful than ever. But instead of letting this turn towards you and your company, you can create trust with your Big Data. Be transparent, store your data in a secure way and let the customers know why you are collecting their data and what they will get back from it. This will generate a win-win situation and create a better user experience.

Here is a blog post where you can read more about data privacy, GDPR and how to create customer trust trough data – Tick the box on gdpr or go above and beyond?

2. What was everyone talking about at the event? (what were the buzzwords)?

Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning in a smart way – Many of the speakers talked about Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its wide opportunity. As you may know, AI is not a new phenomenon. It has actually been around for several years. However, there has been a rising trend for companies to implement Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in their digital strategy for the last couple of years. And now when the hype is over, companies need to start using it in a smart way to exploit its full potential.

If you want to learn more about AI you can read our blog post “3rd wave AI tools evolve for solving real world problems” HERE 

Other buzzwords worth mentioning are VR and how it can change the world, the opportunity in CivTech and technology’s impact on the climate.

3. Tell us something you learned at the event? (three key findings?)

• Think outside the box when it comes to digital transformation and technology.
• The importance of having a diverse team to understand the problem from different angles. Use help from experts if needed.
• Always stay updated, things are moving fast in the digital world.

 

Author: Linnea Jonsson, Marketing Assistans, Basefarm

Linnea is a part of Basefarm’s marketing team. She has a passion for the digital world with the mission to help more companies understand the importance of digital transformation and how it can create new opportunities for an organisation.

SECURE PAYMENTS WITH PAYEX

Why Payex chose basefarm to help build and run their pci dss operational platform

PayEx needed to design, build and run their state of the art Nordic payment solution catering robustness, flexibility and cost efficiency. The platform needed to be PCI DSS compliant as it exchanges, processes and stores huge amounts of card data and financial information. The solution is mission critical and margins and reputation are built over time, by delivering payment services with high quality, competence and value. They needed a secure and stable environment and a partner with solid systems for operations and interaction, as well as an “advisor” regarding technology.

Basefarm designed the platform in close collaboration with PayEx. Since the PCI solution went live in the summer of 2011, it has now passed 300 million transactions with excellent performance, peaking at around 1.3 million transactions per day. PayEx use Basefarm actively and proactively in decision-making regarding the environment and other challenges related to technology.

Read the whole customer case here

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SBAB SAVES 7 MILLION SECONDS

Basefarm’s stable cloud and managed services shorten SBAB’s response time for their most business-critical system by 7 million seconds. “We appreciate Basefarm’s professionalism, their operational delivery and their focus on innovating the business,” says Jan Stenkvist, Senior Vendor Manager at SBAB, answering the question why SBAB is deepening their collaboration with Basefarm.

FROM DAILY INTERRUPTIONS…

Previously, SBAB was comprised by performance issues in one of the most important IT-systems at the bank: the Credit Preparation System. The system is used by customers to apply for a loan through either the website, or one of SBAB’s 150 customer service administrators. The performance problem required a proactive restart – every day. The administrators and the customers had to wait for more than 10 seconds before the system responded, which was unacceptable.

Read the whole customer case here – SBAB customer case

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8 security trends 2019

True to tradition, Basefarm’s Head of Security Operation has looked deep into his crystal ball to see what the new year holds. Here are 8 security trends to look out for in 2019.

1. Workforce gap necessitates different solutions

According to the (ISC)2 organisation, we have a shortage of three million cybersecurity professionals. Without the shortfall, the organisation’s 138,000 membership would be even larger. Europe alone has a workforce gap of 147,000. The shortfall calls for a different approach to meeting security needs, for example, through competence-sharing with other enterprises or security operations centres (SOC).

2. DDoS attacks are becoming less common but more powerful

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks is a major worry. Initially, this type of attack was designed to sabotage, but the aim nowadays is often to steal important data and then blackmail the victims. The trend among perpetrators is not to spread their efforts widely, but rather to focus the attacks more aggressively.

3. Cryptojacking less risky for the attackers than DDoS

The downside for the bad guys of DDoS and many other cyberattacks is the risk of discovery. For this reason, many are turning to cryptojacking instead. Cryptojacking involves infiltrating a large number of computers in order to “mine” cryptocurrency. It is a quick way for cybercriminals to earn money, by getting thousands of computers to work for them for free. There’s no obvious damage done and many people are scarcely aware of the extra processing power and electricity used. If the victims discover the intrusion, they will often just be content to block access.

4. IoT made for trouble

The security issues linked to IoT are not new, but the trend is from bad to worse. This is caused, in simple terms, by a steep rise in sales of IoT gizmos. Not only are unit sales increasing, but more manufacturers are also trying to join in the fun. Not all of them take security as seriously as the established big brands. The key concerns here are configuration errors, default passwords and a lack of upgrade options.

5. And you thought GDPR was strict? Now NIS is on the way

GDPR sets a deadline to notify impacted individuals of 72 hours from detection of a data breach. Looking the other way and detecting nothing is not a solution. Businesses therefore need to monitor infrastructure and logs using an in-house or external SIRT (Security Incident Response Team). In certain sectors, breach reporting needs to be done within 24 hours. Key aspects of the NIS Directive apply from November 2018. A lot of businesses will need to get their heads round this.

6. Safer in an unlit back alley than online

According to the UK’s Office for National Statistics, you are 30 times more likely to be robbed online than in ‘real’ life. With people’s purses and wallets containing little more than easily blocked credit cards, street robbery is going out of fashion. Money is moving over to cyberspace, with the thieves hot on its tail.

7. Decryption is sneaking up from down under

The Australian Anti-Encryption Bill was passed on 6 December 2018 and comes into force early in 2019. Under the legislation, the law enforcement authorities can oblige the tech giants like Google, Facebook, WhatsApp, Amazon and Microsoft to grant them access to encrypted data. The measures include removing electronic protection, installing existing decryption software and developing new software. Serious financial penalties await non-compliant companies

8. IT pros and the white hats strike back

Some of the largest and best-known cyberhacks have been down to sloppy IT practices. The black hat hackers are becoming more sophisticated, but so too are the white hat hackers and other infosec professionals aswell/too. Measures that go a long way to protect enterprises include scanning applications and fixing detected vulnerabilities, two-factor/multifactor authentication, more user names and long passwords, patching/installation of security updates and controlling user curiosity about funny-looking emails.

SEE ALSO: Star Wars – good versus evil – white hats against black hats.

Author: Fredrik Svantes, Senior Information Security Manager, Basefarm

Fredrik Svantes is the Head of the Basefarm Security Operations department and has also lead the Basefarm Security Incident Response Team for the past seven years. Previously he has worked for companies such as Blizzard Entertainment, doing detective work on logs for massive online platforms running games such as World of Warcraft. Blog: http://bfblogg.wpengine.com . Twitter: @fredriksvantes .

WORLD-CLASS PUBLIC E-ADMINISTRATION IN NORWAY

“We landed on a mix of suppliers that best fulfilled our criteria. Basefarm was the best operations supplier.”

So says Edvard Pedersen, project manager for the Altinn solution at the Brønnøysund Register Centre. The government’s ambition is that Norwegian public electronic administration (e-administration) should be the best in the world. Altinn is perhaps their most important card.

“We must have a partner and supplier right out of the top drawer in order to achieve this goal. Basefarm is an important part of achieving the government’s ambitious target,” says Pedersen, who counts his supplier as a partner. We must have an operator and supplier right out of the top drawer in order to achieve this goal.
The decision to award the operations contract was made on the basis of stable operation, predictability, economy, scalability and security. Seen as a whole, Basefarm delivered the best bid,” says Pedersen.

Read the whole customer case here

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Talking about technology trends

Earlier this summer our Chief Business Development Officer and VP in Sweden, Stefan Månsby, were representing Basefarm in an expert panel, talking about trends in the technology magazine IDG. We thought that you who like technology trends would be interested in reading about what we think about the trends. Below you can see Stefan Månsby’s answers from the magazine.

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Question1:
Is it reasonable to invest in creating a hosting solution with configuration tools, monitoring, security and other things that comprises the employees own client devices that they bring to work? How flexible should you be when it comes to choice of client devices? Is it best to create a list over a few approved devices or try to handle all of them?

SM: It’s always more effective to let employees work with the tools that they already use or are familiar with. Treat all clients as they were in an open network with as many foreign computers as familiar computers. Then let the systems they work with, qualify if the client should have access or not.

Question 2:
Many vendors, such as HP, is trying to create a toolkit to handle all IT for companies. This solution often means that you are forced to have two solutions because it’s hard to remove older tools. Will it be possible to run entirely with modern solutions in three years, or will we be forced to continue using older tools in parallel?

SM: The important thing is to remember that you first of all create a decommissioning plan for the old tools, and then create a plan for the new tools that are in line with the decommissioning plan. In this way, you avoid to duplicate tools. It’s important that you work with follow-up of the outcome.

Question 3:
How far have Swedish companies come in integrate local recourses with cloud resources in their hosting solutions? Is it a realistic goal to try and do it?

SM: The Swedish companies haven’t gone far in this area. The small percentage that using cloud, use it for e-mail or CRM, which usually isn’t integrated with any internal system. Today, there is too little expertise within cloud integration among Swedish consultants and integrators.

Question 4:
The SOA (Service-oriented architecture) thinking is not that hot anymore, but many companies have actually implemented this type of strategies. Are there any general hosting solutions to manage the services that are created or are proprietary solutions required?

SM: I can’t agree that SOA isn’t still a hot subject. It’s only smaller projects and companies that have started to realize that it’s not profitable to add extra work for SOA. The hosting solution for a SOA or non-SOA architecture have in principle the same set of requirements and needs.