BF-SIRT Newsletter 2018-21

BUG in GIT opens developers systems up to attack.

Git repository hosting services GitHub, GitLab and Microsoft VSTS each patched a serious vulnerability on Tuesday that could lead to arbitrary code execution when a developer uses a malicious repository.

Developers behind the open-source development Git tool pushed out Git 2.17.1, addressing two bugs (CVE-2018-11233 and CVE-2018-11235).

“These are tricky vulnerabilities that will require the Git hosting services to patch, but also individual developers who are using the tool,” said Tim Jarrett, senior director of security, Veracode.

Of the two vulnerabilities, CVE-2018-11235 is the most worrisome, researchers said.

The vulnerability is described as a submodule configuration flaw that surfaces when the Git submodule configuration is cloned. Git provides developers with post-checkout hooks, which are executed within the context of the project. Those hooks can be defined within the submodules, and submodules can be malicious and directed to execute code.

“The software does not properly validate submodule ‘names’ supplied via the untrusted .gitmodules file when appending them to the ‘$GIT_DIR/modules’ directory. A remote repository can return specially crafted data to create or overwrite files on the target user’s system when the repository is cloned, causing arbitrary code to be executed on the target user’s system,” according to a SecurityTracker description of the flaw.

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