Web Security Vulnerabilities and How to Fix them

Wondering how to fix web security vulnerabilities? Scan regularly with tools like Detectify, do in-depth fixing and establish a security directed culture. This is easier with DevOps tools.

Data Thinking: A Guide to Success in the Digital Age

How do we keep up with the pace of digitalization and take control over our own digital development? And how do we learn new skills and routines that lead to successful digitalization? It all starts with a modern way of thinking and acting. At Basefarm we call it Data Thinking.

Cloud computing is creating new challenges

This blog post is a summary of this week’s Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT)

According to Mike Kun in an article for threatpost.com:

“Cloud computing is creating new challenges among security professionals as attackers embrace the “as-a-service model”, giving unsophisticated cybercriminals a leg up in carrying out attacks.”

“This evolution creates new challenges for defenders. New technologies are constantly reshaping the business landscape, but business leaders also must consider how these can enable new attacks – or make old mitigations obsolete.

Read more

Top 5 Security Links

 

Dynamic Content Attacks and How to Mitigate them

This blog post is a summary of this weeks Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

“Most dynamic content attacks are launched against content delivery networks. The attacker uses networks of infected hosts or botnets to request non-cached content from the target. If enough of these requests are made, the server will be overloaded and crash.”

“Taking the right precautions is essential. Here are some steps that you can take to protect your CDN from a dynamic content attack.”

Read more …

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Security Software & Tools Tips – October 2018

In this monthly post we try to make you aware of five different security related products.
This is a repost from my personal website Ulyaoth.

This month we have chosen the following:
* Hiawatha
* Shodan
* GRR
* Cloudfail
* AbuseIO

Hiawatha


Hiawatha is a cool lightweight webserver that has a very easy syntax to configure it.
The maker of Hiawatha has written the webserver with security in mind, so it provides out of the box support for stopping SQL injections, XSS and CSRF attacks and exploit attempts.
We think Hiawatha is a great secure alternative for Apache or Nginx.

From the Hiawatha website:

Hiawatha is an open source webserver with a focus on security. I started Hiawatha in January 2002. Before that time, I had used several webservers, but I didn’t like them. They had illogical, almost cryptic configuration syntax and none of them gave me a good feeling about their security and robustness. So, I decided it was time to write my own webserver. I never thought that my webserver would become what it is today, but I enjoyed working on it and liked to have my own open source project. In the years that followed, Hiawatha became a fully functional webserver.

Website:

https://www.hiawatha-webserver.org/

Shodan


Shodan is a website where you can scan internet connected devices for open services. This is a great tool to find out if your
organization has any services exposed to the internet that might be a security risk.

From wiki:

Shodan is a search engine that lets the user find specific types of computers connected to the internet using a variety of filters. Some have also described it as a search engine of service banners, which are metadata that the server sends back to the client.

Website:

https://www.shodan.io/

GRR


GRR (Rapid Response) framework is a server client software that allows you to do live forensics on remote servers.

From their website:

GRR Rapid Response is an incident response framework focused on remote live forensics.
The goal of GRR is to support forensics and investigations in a fast, scalable manner to allow analysts to quickly triage attacks and perform analysis remotely.

Website:

https://github.com/google/grr

Cloudfail

From their website:

CloudFail is a tactical reconnaissance tool which aims to gather enough information about a target protected by Cloudflare in the hopes of discovering the location of the server. Using Tor to mask all requests, the tool as of right now has 3 different attack phases.

* Misconfigured DNS scan using DNSDumpster.
* Scan the Crimeflare database.
* Bruteforce scan over 2500 subdomains.

Website:

https://github.com/m0rtem/CloudFail

AbuseIO


This piece of software gives you a web interface that imports most important feeds such as shadowserver and spamcop, you can then see this information in a easy and relevant way.
This is a great tool to automate and improve the abuse handling process.

From their website:

It is a toolkit anyone can use to receive, process, correlate abuse reports and send notifications with specific information regarding the abuse case(s) on your network. AbuseIO’s purpose is to consolidate efforts by various companies and individuals to automate and improve the abuse handling process.

Website:

https://abuse.io/download/

Photo by Liam Tucker on Unsplash

Why use a Managed Service Provider for Amazon Web Services

Do you think taking the step to the cloud is a challenge in itself? And now that you finally chose Amazon Web Services (AWS) as your cloud solution, how should you go about to learn how to manage it? Maybe you don’t really have time to spend on these types of concerns.

How a Web Application Firewall can protect against bad coding

You might think, and you could even be right in that your own web application is perfectly written with zero bugs, so that no attacker can obtain information they should not be able to. But what about the software surrounding your web application? Unfortunately, this software often is things you don’t have control over like frameworks, web servers, operating systems, and sometimes even hardware.

Hackers Turn to Python as Attack Coding Language of Choice

This blog post is a summary of this weeks Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

 

Hackers Turn to Python as Attack Coding Language of Choice

“More than 20 percent of GitHub repositories containing an attack tool or an exploit proof of concept (PoC) are written in Python.”

Read more..

 

Top 5 Security links

 

CIOs don’t know what DevOps is

‘DevOps is not an IT platform but a culture: that’s where it often goes wrong’

It seems that only one of every ten innovative software projects sees the light of day, despite CIOs setting up agile DevOps teams that develop new functionalities at a lightning pace. ‘CIOs have the world at their feet, but become the victim of their own success,’ says Jan Aril Sigvartsen of Basefarm.

Thousands of breached websites turn up on MagBo Black market

This blog post is a summary of this weeks Information Security News put together by our Security Incident Response Team (SIRT).

Thousands of breached websites turn up on MagBo Black market

The research team said it has shared its findings with law enforcement and victims are being notified.

A newly-discovered underground marketplace has been peddling access to more than 3,000 breached websites, catering to hackers hungry for valuable data and the ability to launch a range of attacks on unsuspecting site visitors.

Advertisements for the Russian-speaking marketplace called MagBo were first posted on a top-tier hacking forum in March, according to researchers at Flashpoint. Upon further investigation, the research team found that details for thousands of breached websites were for sale on MagBo.

“This particular market is populated by a more than a dozen vendors and hundreds of buyers who sell and take part in auctions in order to gain access to breached sites, databases and administrator panels,” said Vitali Kremez, a researcher with Flashpoint in a Wednesday post.

Top 5 Security links